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Now showing at Chapter Market Road,Canton,Cardiff,South Glamorgan CF5 1QE 029 2030 4400

  • Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice
  • Demolition
  • Florence Foster Jenkins
  • Inside Out
  • Miles Ahead
  • Playtime
  • Robot & Frank
  • The Man Who Knew Infinity
  • Zootropolis

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice 3 stars

Gotham City and the world at large struggle to come to terms with the arrival of Metropolis' modern-day saviour, Superman. Formidable vigilante Batman fears the actions of Superman and declares war. While the two figures are locked in battle, inflamed by the scheming of Lex Luthor, a new threat arises. Just when all hope seems lost, Wonder Woman enters the fray to bring together Batman and Superman in Gotham City's hour of need.

  • GenreAction, Adaptation, Adventure, Drama, Fantasy, Romance, Science Fiction
  • CastHenry Cavill, Ben Affleck, Amy Adams, Jeremy Irons, Holly Hunter, Gal Gadot, Diane Lane, Jesse Eisenberg.
  • DirectorZack Snyder.
  • WriterChris Terrio, David S Goyer.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration151 mins
  • Official sitewww.batmanvsuperman.dccomics.com
  • Release25/03/2016

Heroes rise and fall in Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice, a super-powered smackdown involving two of DC Comics' most popular characters that neatly tees up a blitzkrieg of Justice League features and blockbuster spin-offs. With Zack Snyder, director of Man Of Steel, at the helm, every frame is crammed to bursting with artfully composed destruction. Gun barrels unleash spinning cylinders of hot metal in lustrous slow motion, a female victim tumbles to the floor amidst a cascade of milky white pearls from her broken necklace, exploding vehicles pirouette through the nighttime air during a high-velocity chase. While visuals stage a full-scale assault on the eyes, Oscar-winning composer Hans Zimmer cranks up the volume in collaboration with Dutch producer Junkie XL. If nothing else, Batman V Superman delivers a cacophony of slam and bang. Screenwriters Chris Terrio and David S Goyer haven't scrimped on character development or narrative, knitting together sinewy subplots with flashbacks and dream sequences involving Thomas Wayne (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) and Jonathan Kent (Kevin Costner) to embellish the origin stories of the titular combatants. Unquestionably, there is a leaner two-hour film lurking within this bloated beast, but brevity has never been one of Snyder's virtues. The world struggles to come to terms with the arrival of Metropolis' modern-day messiah, Superman (Henry Cavill). A committee led by Senator June Finch (Holly Hunter) asks uncomfortable questions about the god-like protector and his ability to crush humanity. Martha Kent (Diane Lane) tells her son that he doesn't owe the human race anything but Clark's heart belongs to Daily Planet co-worker Lois Lane (Amy Adams). "I don't know if it's possible for you to love me - and be you," she worries. Unfortunately, tortured vigilante Batman (Ben Affleck) holds Superman accountable for the deaths of the innocent and declares war. "Maybe it's just Gotham City and me - we have a bad history with freaks dressed as clowns," snarls the orphaned philanthropist, who is aided by his sardonic butler Alfred (Jeremy Irons). While the two crimefighters are locked in battle, inflamed by the scheming of Lex Luthor (Jesse Eisenberg), a new threat arises. When all hope seems lost, Amazonian warrior Wonder Woman (Gal Gadot) enters the fray... Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice aims for a similarly downbeat tone to Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight trilogy, replete with explosions of bone-crunching violence. Action sequences are robust but the miasma of digital effects sometimes reduces skirmishes to a blur. Snappy dialogue sounds like it has been torn from the pages of comic books and Affleck and Cavill engage in a battle of topless posturing and chisel-jawed stoicism. Eisenberg's twitchy, psychotic archnemesis stays the right side of pantomime - just. "Nobody cares about Clark Kent taking on the Batman," screams Daily Planet editor-in-chief Perry White (Laurence Fishburne). I beg to differ.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 29th May 2016
Monday 30th May 2016
Tuesday 31st May 2016
Wednesday 1st June 2016
Thursday 2nd June 2016

This film is also showing at:

Demolition 3 stars

Banker Davis Mitchell is left emotionally numb by the death of his wife Julia in a car accident. Unable to grieve and unmoved by his colleagues' and loved ones' concern, Davis turns to customer services representative Karen for support. They eventually meet and Davis becomes entwined in Karen's life and that of her troubled teenage son Chris, who has become cold and distant to her lately. As time goes on, Davis reverts to more extreme tactics to feel again.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, Romance
  • CastNaomi Watts, Heather Lind, Jake Gyllenhaal, Judah Lewis, Chris Cooper.
  • DirectorJean-Marc Vallee.
  • WriterBryan Sipe.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration99 mins
  • Official sitewww.foxsearchlight.com/demolition
  • Release29/04/2016

Grief, we're told, comes in many different forms. There's no wrong way to grieve, apparently. Except of course, there is. And nowhere is grief more structured than in Hollywood. There, grief is either a granite albatross weighing the sufferer down until eventually they crack and, more often than not, scream at a coldly beautiful landscape until finally, their artful tears fall, or, it is quite the opposite; it is a fully formed thing from the offset. This much-seen Hollywood version of grief is a blanket which the sufferer is wholly covered and fully in tune with, basking in their loss while a soundtrack of touching acoustic songs play out as the screen is flooded with a golden-tinged montage of 'better times'; long beach walks, ice creams licked off noses and soft punches on the arm, before realising with a shrug, that of course, "This..." - be it selling the house, finding a new partner, or donating their beloved's cardigan - "...is what he/she would have wanted". Demolition, the new comedy drama from Wild and Dallas Buyers Club director Jean-Marc Vallee, then offers neither trope for its anti hero, Davis Mitchell (Jake Gyllenhaal). It's not a version of grief any of the dearly departed would want for their loved ones. Widowed after a car accident killed his wife Julia (Heather Lind), the young banker is left with a numbness he can't shake. He's not just numb about his high-flying job at the bank, where his father-in-law Phil (Chris Cooper) also happens to be the boss, or his covetable home and possessions, he's also indifferent to Julia's death and unmoved by his colleagues and loved ones' needs for him to heal, or at least heal in a way they understand. The only person who penetrates his apathetic exterior is Karen (Naomi Watts). As the customer services representative for a vending machine company, Karen receives a letter of complaint from Davis about the machine in the hospital which gobbled his money, but didn't give him his goods on the night of his wife's death. But while he writes about the complaint, he also expands on his life and loss, until eventually his letters become increasingly confessional in tone to the point where Karen and Davis meet and strike a friendship. Soon, Davis becomes entwined in Karen's life and that of her troubled teenage son Chris (Judah Lewis) who has become cold and distant to her lately. As time goes on, Davis reverts to more extreme tactics - much to the shock of Phil - to feel again and, with the help of Karen and Chris, to rebuild his life and, in turn, unlock the struggles Chris is going through. While sentimentality could be rife, Demolition avoids it largely due to the welcome flashes of humour and thoughtful performances from Gyllenhaal and his young co-star Lewis, but it's just a shame that Watts is underwritten.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 29th May 2016
Monday 30th May 2016
Tuesday 31st May 2016
Wednesday 1st June 2016
Thursday 2nd June 2016

Florence Foster Jenkins 4 stars

Amateur operatic soprano Florence Foster Jenkins is determined to further her musical ambitions with the help of her second husband and doting companion, St Clair. The couple auditions several accompanists and Cosme Moon lands the position of Florence's pianist. The grand dame pays Cosme well and he gradually falls under his wealthy employer's spell, acknowledging that she is just following her dream, like everyone else.

  • GenreBiography, Comedy, Drama, Historical/Period, Musical, Romance
  • CastMeryl Streep, Hugh Grant, Simon Helberg, Rebecca Ferguson.
  • DirectorStephen Frears.
  • WriterNicholas Martin.
  • CountryUK/Fr
  • Duration110 mins
  • Official site
  • Release06/05/2016

Auditions for televised talent shows throw up a limitless supply of deluded wannabes, who refuse to let a lack of musicality or rhythm hamper their quest for pop superstardom. Occasionally, these lovable misfits strike a chord because of their unfettered enthusiasm - witness the inexorable rise of The Cheeky Girls and Jedward. Amateur operatic soprano Florence Foster Jenkins was one such endearing eccentric, who became a cause celebre in 1930s and 1940s New York precisely because she was unable to hold a note during her infamous recitals of Verdi, Brahms and Mozart. Recordings of her caterwauling became collector's items and her concerts were always sold out. Jenkins brought joy to millions and remained convinced of her soaring abilities until her glorious end, aged 76. This real-life story of triumph against sniggering cynicism provides rich inspiration for Stephen Frears' rollicking comedy drama. Anchored by tour-de-force performances from Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant that perfectly harmonise humour and pathos, Florence Foster Jenkins is an unabashedly joyful period piece that stands resolutely behind the eponymous socialite as she massacres the Laughing Song from Die Fledermaus or the Queen Of The Night aria from The Magic Flute. As the heroine remarks, "People may say I couldn't sing but no one can say I didn't sing." Florence (Streep) is determined to further her musical ambitions with the help of her second husband and doting companion, St Clair (Grant). "I shall need a pianist. Someone young, someone with passion!" declares Florence excitedly. The couple auditions several accompanists but they fail to meet Florence's exacting standards. "He's raping my ears. Make him stop!" she pleads after one hopeful tinkles the ivories. Cosme Moon (Simon Helberg) eventually lands the position of Florence's pianist and his first experience of Florence in full voice is played for tear-streaming belly laughs by Frears. The grand dame pays Cosme well and he gradually falls under his wealthy employer's spell, acknowledging that she is just following her dream, like everyone else. Vocal coach Carlo Edwards (David Haig) and venerated conductor Arturo Toscanini (John Kavanagh) prepare Florence for a big concert at the world-famous Carnegie Hall. However, St Clair worries that the stress of the forthcoming engagement is playing havoc with her faltering health. "What if it kills you?" he frets. "Then I shall die happy," smiles Florence serenely. Audiences will certainly die happy after watching Florence Foster Jenkins. Streep is mesmerising, bringing tenderness and vulnerability to a role that could so easily have been played as a pitiful figure of mockery. Grant is a wonderful comic foil and he demonstrates a light touch in moving scenes that remind us of his oft-ignored abilities as a dramatic actor. Period design is impeccable and Frears builds to a rousing emotional crescendo worthy of one of Jenkins' standing ovations. Bravo!

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 29th May 2016
Monday 30th May 2016
Tuesday 31st May 2016
Wednesday 1st June 2016
Thursday 2nd June 2016

This film is also showing at:

Inside Out 5 stars

movie title

From the moment baby Riley opens her eyes, her mood is shaped by five coloured emotions - Joy, Sadness, Fear, Anger and Disgust - which bicker behind a large control desk laden with buttons and levers. Joy is the dominant emotion in Headquarters and she safeguards Riley's memories, which are stored as glowing orbs. When Riley turns 11, her parents relocate from Minnesota to San Francisco. Traumatic events such as a first day at a new school nudge Sadness to the fore.

  • GenreAnimation/Cartoon, Comedy, Family, Family
  • CastDiane Lane, Amy Poehler, Kyle MacLachlan, Bill Hader, Phyllis Smith, Lewis Black, Mindy Kaling.
  • DirectorPete Docter, Ronaldo Del Carmen.
  • WriterPete Docter, Meg LeFauve, Josh Cooley.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration102 mins
  • Official sitewww.movies.disney.com/inside-out
  • Release24/07/2015

Despite gargantuan advances in medical science, we still don't fully understand the complexities of the human brain: its ability to process vast quantities of information, solve problems and store memories at speeds that put supercomputers to shame.

Pixar Animation Studios, the wizards who conjured the Toy Story trilogy, contemplate the vagaries of neuropsychology with this visually stunning and emotionally rich comedy, which unfolds predominantly inside the head of a little girl.

This high-brow concept doesn't seem like the most accessible subject matter for a family-oriented computer animation. But directors Pete Docter and Ronaldo Del Carmen elegantly tilt their film at the windmills of the mind and deliver a hilarious, heartfelt and ultimately life-affirming adventure that celebrates childhood innocence, family unity and the power of the human spirit to overcome adversity.

Laughter and tears abound, as well as cute visual gags, ensuring parents will be repeatedly dabbing their eyes while children whoop and gurgle with glee at the slapstick and rollicking action sequences.

A mother (voiced by Diane Lane) and father (Kyle MacLachlan) welcome a baby girl called Riley (Kaitlyn Dias) into the world. From the moment she opens her eyes, Riley's mood is shaped by five coloured emotions - golden Joy (Amy Poehler), blue Sadness (Phyllis Smith), purple Fear (Bill Hader), red Anger (Lewis Black) and green Disgust (Mindy Kaling) - which bicker behind a large control desk laden with buttons and levers.

Joy is the dominant emotion in Headquarters and she safeguards Riley's memories, which are stored as glowing orbs, tinged with the colour of the emotion that prevailed at the time. When Riley turns 11, her parents relocate from Minnesota to San Francisco.

Traumatic events such as a first day at a new school nudge Sadness to the fore. Following an altercation, sworn rivals Joy and Sadness are expelled from Headquarters and find themselves stranded in the labyrinth of Riley's long-term memories.

Aided by Riley's imaginary friend Bing Bong (Richard Kind), Joy and Sadness blaze a haphazard trail on the chugging train of thought back to Fear, Anger and Disgust, who have been left in charge of Headquarters, with disastrous consequences.

Inside Out is Pixar's best film since the holy animated trilogy of WALL-E, Up and Toy Story 3. Docter's script, co-written by Meg LeFauve and Josh Cooley, glisters with imagination, wit and invention, delivering guffaws with detours into the heads of Riley's parents as they attempt to deal with her pre-teenage rebellion.

Vocal performances are note perfect, led by Poehler's exuberant portrayal of Joy and Smith's sincere embodiment of Sadness, who tugs heartstrings as the film reaches its exquisite conclusion.

The film is preceded by a short: a musical love story entitled Lava between two volcanoes called Uku and Lele, directed by James Ford Murphy. Joy and Sadness shared blissful control of my mind throughout.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 29th May 2016

Miles Ahead 3 stars

Rolling Stone reporter Dave Brill confirms an interview with Miles Davis to discuss his years out of the limelight. During these candid confessions, Dave becomes enmeshed in his subject's affair including Davis' tempestuous relationship with his wife Frances Taylor. Past and present collide as Davis attempts to resolve conflicts and retain control of a session tape that everyone in town wants to get their hands on.

Protegee. Pioneer. Heroin addict. That there were many shades to musician Miles Davis' life is a given. But what's not, is that a memorable life lived means a memorable biopic made. Happily then, Hotel Rwanda and Boogie Nights actor Don Cheadle does a sterling job - or numerous jobs - as the co-writer, leading man and co-producer in Miles Ahead, his directorial debut about the late jazz trumpeter's 65 years. Like Davis' music and the mythology surrounding him, Miles Ahead follows its own rules, swerving the standard cradle-to-grave structure and instead offering up an elegant snapshot of Davis' life in the late Seventies. Set five years on from his self-induced exit from public life - and his subsequent pause in releasing new music - Miles Ahead sees him drug-addled and in pain from a chronic hip complaint. Living alone in a chemically induced stupor, he is taunted by memories of the breakdown of his marriage to muse and dancer Frances Taylor (Emayatzy Corinealdi) some years before. That the relationship was marred with his infidelity and abuse is neither glossed over nor glamourised, and consequently the portrayal is all the better for it. Equally plaguing his thoughts are demands from his record label, who are desperate to bring the world another recording. When wily - and fictional - Rolling Stones journalist Dave Braden (Ewan McGregor) forces his way into Davis' house to get the scoop on a rumoured tape of his latest compositions, the mercurial musician is seething and angrily accompanies him to the record label which, according to Braden, arranged the chat. There they meet unscrupulous music executive Harper Hamilton (Michael Stuhlbarg), who sneakily gets his mitts on the recording. Hamilton is hell-bent on delivering a new Miles Davis record to his fans and, in doing so, netting a handsome profit for the company. He's also eager to secure Miles' support for his new jazz wonderkid Junior (Lakeith Lee Stanfield), which would also create a healthy and lucrative buzz around him. Unfortunately for Hamilton, Miles couldn't give a fiddle about sales and ingenues and stops at nothing to take back what is his, taking Dave with him to write up his adventure. United though they are in the pursuit; buddy movie this ain't. If anything, the distance and cold resentment - though there are occasional flashes of camaraderie - between Miles and Dave adds a pitch-perfect humour to the already whip-smart script. Told through flashbacks, which are more free flowing than formulaic, and sharp performances, Miles Ahead is a stylish and instructive sideways glance at the late legend's life, that like all good things, leaves you wanting more.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 29th May 2016
Monday 30th May 2016
Tuesday 31st May 2016
Wednesday 1st June 2016
Thursday 2nd June 2016

Playtime 3 stars

Easily bamboozled Monsieur Hulot crosses paths with a young American tourist called Barbara, who is visiting France with her companion and a tour group of predominantly middle-aged women. They first intersect at a trade exhibition of the latest gadgets such as a broom fitted with headlights. Hulot heads off to meet an old friend and enjoy a meal with his coterie before giving Barbara two small mementos to remind her of a magical stay in the French capital.

  • GenreComedy
  • CastRita Maiden, France Rumilly, France Delahalle.
  • DirectorJacques Tati.
  • CountryFr
  • Duration113 mins
  • Official site

A reissue of Jacques Tati's celebrated 1967 film, his fourth feature in which he reprises his role as the easily bamboozled Monsieur Hulot. Playtime comprises six vignettes in which Hulot occasionally crosses paths with a young American tourist called Barbara (Barbara Dennek), who is visiting France with her companion (Jacqueline Lecomte) and a tour group of predominantly middle-aged women. They first intersect at a trade exhibition of the latest gadgets such as a broom fitted with headlights. Hulot heads off to meet an old friend and enjoy a meal with his coterie before giving Barbara two small mementos to remind her of a magical stay in the French capital.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 29th May 2016

Robot & Frank 4 stars

movie title

Ageing ex-con Frank lives alone and is slowly relinquishing his grasp on memories of the past. So the old man's techno-reliant son installs a servant robot to do Frank's bidding. At first, Frank is reluctant to switch on the automaton, but once he learns that VGC-60L has no programming to distinguish right from wrong, man and machine carry out a theft at the local library, then ramp up their larcenous activities with wryly amusing and heartbreaking consequences.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, Indie, Romance, Science Fiction
  • CastSusan Sarandon, Peter Sarsgaard, Frank Langella, Liv Tyler, Jeremy Strong, James Marsden.
  • DirectorJake Schreier.
  • WriterChristopher D Ford.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration89 mins
  • Official sitewww.robotandfrank-film.com
  • Release08/03/2013 (selected cinemas)

Directed by Jake Schreier, Robot & Frank is a futuristic buddy movie about the unusual bond of trust between an ageing ex-con called Frank (Frank Langella), whose memory is faltering, and his VGC-60L robot helper (voiced by Peter Sarsgaard). Frank lives alone and is slowly relinquishing his grasp on memories of the past. So the old man's techno-reliant son (James Marsden) installs a servant bot to do Frank's bidding. At first, Frank is reluctant to switch on the automaton, but once he learns that VGC-60L has no programming to distinguish right from wrong, man and machine carry out a theft at the local library, then ramp up their larcenous activities with wryly amusing and heartbreaking consequences. "Are you in?" Frank wonders excitedly. "Only if you agree to eat a low-sodium diet from now on," dryly responds his mechanised sidekick. Robot & Frank is an endearing slice of techno-life, anchored by a terrific performance from Langella as a cantankerous old coot who finds companionship when he least expects it. Susan Sarandon, Liv Tyler and Marsden offer solid supporting performances as friends and loved ones, helping Frank through the fog of his twilight years. The plot is slight and the resolution messy but the central relationship is always touchingly believable.

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Tuesday 31st May 2016

The Man Who Knew Infinity 3 stars

Srinivasa Ramanujan is a 25-year-old shipping clerk in 1913 Madras, who should be spending as much time as possible with his wife Janaki. Instead, he fills countless notebooks with his mathematical musings. He sends some of these proofs to revered academic GH Hardy, who invites Ramanujan to Trinity College, Cambridge to exercise his beautiful mind. Against the wishes of his bride and his harridan mother, Ramanujan accepts the invitation and travels by sea to the hallowed seat of learning.

  • GenreAdaptation, Biography, Drama
  • CastDev Patel, Toby Jones, Jeremy Irons, Stephen Fry, Jeremy Northam.
  • DirectorMatt Brown.
  • WriterMatt Brown.
  • CountryUK
  • Duration109 mins
  • Official site
  • Release08/04/2016 (selected cinemas)

Mathematics is the only universal language which transcends race, religion, culture and class. Breathtaking in its simplicity and application, the study of number, quantity and space impacts every facet of our lives, from GPS systems and the functionality of computers, to our ability to predict the weather. Adapted from Robert Kanigel's 1991 biography, The Man Who Knew Infinity is a handsome dramatisation of the life of a self-taught Indian mathematician, who came to England just before the First World War to share his passion for numbers. It's a glowing tribute, written and directed by Matthew Brown, which extols its remarkable subject, Srinivasa Ramanujan, as a beautiful mind, who conjured solutions out of the ether. Sadly, Brown's film fails to make clear exactly what these secrets were and how the lead character was instrumental in ploughing new cerebral furrows. Only once, on the subject of partitions, does the script invest time in illuminating the daunting challenge in layman's terms, so we can share in Ramanujan's frustrations and triumph as he wrestles with "a rabbit hole mystery of the universe". Ramanujan (Dev Patel) is a 25-year-old shipping clerk in 1914 Madras, who dreams about formulae, which he scribbles in chalk on temple floors. With the blessing of his employer, Sir Francis Spring (Stephen Fry), Ramanujan sends some of his mathematical musings to revered academic GH Hardy (Jeremy Irons), who is a fellow at Trinity College, Cambridge alongside Bertrand Russell (Jeremy Northam). Hardy invites the bank clerk to England to nurture his gift. Against the wishes of his controlling mother (Arundhati Nag), Ramanujan bids tearful farewell to his new wife (Devika Bhise) and travels by sea to the hallowed seat of learning. In rarefied surroundings, Ramanujan encounters jealousy from students and masters, including Professor Howard (Anthony Calf) and Major McMahon (Kevin McNally). Thankfully, a few scholars, such as John Edensor Littlewood (Toby Jones), recognise Ramanujan's raw talent and encourage the Indian to indulge his fascination with prime numbers. "Don't be intimidated," beams Littlewood. "The greatest knowledge often comes from the humblest of origins." Working closely with Hardy, Ramanujan makes a series of breakthroughs and challenges the Englishman's long-held atheism. "I don't believe in anything I can't prove," concedes Hardy. "Then you can't believe in me," replies Ramanujan sadly. The Man Who Knew Infinity was shot on location at Trinity College and the film savours the rich history and architecture as a backdrop to Ramanujan's journey of self-discovery. Patel and Irons are a pleasing double act - youthful exuberance colliding with stuffy stiff-upper-lipped restraint - culminating in genuinely touching scenes between the two men. However, by the poignant end credits, we're no closer to fully understanding Ramanujan's invaluable contribution to a world of rigorous theorems and proofs. If an equation exists, which describes the perfect biographical drama, it eludes the filmmakers.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 29th May 2016
Monday 30th May 2016
Tuesday 31st May 2016
Wednesday 1st June 2016
Thursday 2nd June 2016

Zootropolis 4 stars

Judy Hopps becomes the first serving rabbit police officer in the city of Zootopia. Inducted into the force by Mayor Leodore Lionheart, Judy is initially assigned to traffic duty by Chief Bogo, who doubts her abilities due to her size. During one of her shifts, Judy defies orders and she suffers the wrath of Bogo. In order to prove her worth, Judy vows to solve the case of a missing resident, Mr Otterton, within 48 hours or she will resign.

  • GenreAction, Adventure, Animation/Cartoon, Comedy, Drama, Family, Family
  • CastJason Bateman, Ginnifer Goodwin, Idris Elba, Octavia Spencer, JK Simmons.
  • DirectorRich Moore, Byron Howard, Jared Bush.
  • WriterPhil Johnston, Jared Bush.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration108 mins
  • Official sitemovies.disney.co.uk/zootropolis
  • Release25/03/2016

Creatures great and small live in perfect harmony in Byron Howard and Rich Moore's anthropomorphic animated feature that continues Disney's winning streak under the creative leadership of John Lasseter. Zootropolis is a beautifully crafted parable that elegantly combines a noir detective thriller, buddy cop comedy and coming of age story with the studio's trademark visual splendour. It's a tour de force of uproarious laughter and tears, accompanied by a gorgeous genre-melding orchestral score from Michael Giacchino that tugs the heartstrings. Screenwriters Jared Bush and Phil Johnston engineer plentiful hairpin twists and turns, mining comedy from mammalian traits while underscoring each bravura set piece with valuable life lessons about prejudice, tolerance and teamwork. Neat visual gags abound including, a small time weasel criminal selling bootleg DVDs of Disney animations Wreck-It Rhino and Wrangled, or familiar chain stores that have been cutely rebranded for creature customers. Zootropolis even cheekily pokes fun at Frozen's song of empowerment, Let It Go, before unleashing its own infectious anthem, Try Everything, sung to the rafters by Shakira in the guise of a chart-topping savannah diva called Gazelle. Bunnyburrow carrot farmer Stu Hopps (voiced by Don Lake) and wife Bonnie (Bonnie Hunt) try to dissuade their daughter Judy (Ginnifer Goodwin) from pursuing her dream of becoming the first serving rabbit police officer in Zootropolis. "If you don't try anything new, you'll never fail," chirpily professes Stu. Unperturbed, Judy earns her police badge as part of the Mammal Inclusion Initiative championed by Mayor Leodore Lionheart (JK Simmons) and his diminutive second in command, Assistant Mayor Dawn Bellwether (Jenny Slate). Judy is initially assigned to traffic duty by Chief Bogo (Idris Elba), who doubts her abilities. In order to prove her worth, the new cop on the block vows to solve the case of a missing resident. "I will give you 48 hours to find Emmitt Otterton. You strike out, you resign," growls Chief Bogo, sensing an opportunity to rid himself of the bouncing bunny. With the clock ticking, Judy gathers evidence from concerned wife Mrs Otterton (Octavia Spencer) and implores a con artist fox called Nick Wilde (Jason Bateman) to help her break the case. Working with an animal who should be her sworn enemy, Judy stumbles upon a grand conspiracy involving Arctic shrew Mr Big (Maurice LaMarche), who presides over the criminal fraternity in Tundratown with his polar henchbears. Zootropolis is 108 minutes of unadulterated joy, rendered in exquisitely detailed animation. Vocal performances are flawless, particularly Goodwin as the dreamer with a big heart, who truly believes that anyone can achieve their dreams if they put their paws to it. A protracted sequence involving a three-toed sloth called Flash (Raymond S Persi), who works Department of Mammal Vehicles, is nothing short of genius. Hop to it - Zootropolis is the bunny's whiskers.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 30th May 2016
Tuesday 31st May 2016
Wednesday 1st June 2016
Thursday 2nd June 2016

This film is also showing at: